Are You A Writer When You’re Not Writing?

I just had a month of pure freedom.

And I hope that doesn’t happen ever again!

You see, last fall I started working on two huge articles that involved a lot of research and a gazillion discussions with my  call-you-every-five-minutes-with-another-question editor. I knew these assignments would keep me busy nearly full-time through January. So I put my nose to the grindstone, while February  beckoned, with its promise of free time to read, have lunch with friends, play at fiction writing, troll around for some fresh, new projects, imagine maybe a book project or two…

And sure, February 1st was great, and February 2nd wasn’t so bad either. But by February 6th, I was in a panic. Why was nobody calling? Where were my next assignments? How long was this dry spell going to last?

Of course, there was a real question lurking behind all these worries — and it surfaced in mid-February when I met someone new in town and introduced myself as a freelance writer. Suddenly my mouth felt dry and my cheeks sort of started to burn. Hah! the little voice in my head said with contempt.  How can you say you’re a freelance writer when you haven’t had an assignment in weeks? You’re nothing but a fraud! 

Ah, so that was the question I was wrestling with. Was I freelance writer when I wasn’t…well, writing? And if so, then when would I stop being a freelance writer? After four weeks of no assignments? Eight? Six months? Come to think of it, have I really ever been a freelance writer? Or have I always been merely a lucky wannabe?

My insecurities led me to make a bunch of stupid decisions — like sending out queries for articles that I really didn’t want to write, just because I thought I could get the assignment. And emailing an editor I haven’t heard from in a while, just to “touch base” and “say hi.” I should know better. Article assignments comes from great ideas, not from desperate “remember me?” emails.

Happily, in early March I heard from two editors, one of whom I had basically written off because I had sent her what I thought were two wonderful ideas in January and she hadn’t gotten back to me. In my panic, I thought she hated my ideas — when actually, there had just been a problem with her email account that she only recently noticed. I now have three major assignments, and I’m busy as ever.

I only wish I had made more of freedom when I had it.

What do you think? Do you have to be actively writing to consider yourself a writer? How do you handle insecurity, which is so much a part of a freelancer’s existence?

Another self-doubting day in the life of just another working writer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 Responses to “Are You A Writer When You’re Not Writing?”

  1. Christopher Patterson Says:

    I envy your position to even question if you are a freelance writer or not. I personally cannot call myself a writer, so I monkey around under the title “Aspiring Writer”. Sure, I write almost every day, and I don’t think you have to be paid to be considered a writer. It’s just that I think that you ‘are’ what people describe you. For me, friends, family, co-workers, and strangers would describe me as a friend, or a father, or a son, or a guy with a silly looking hat. But they wouldn’t say “Oh yeah, he’s a writer.” I hope to be someday, freelance or otherwise.

    • justanotherworkingwriter Says:

      Thanks for your thoughtful comment! I think I was talking mostly about how destructive insecurity can be. When you come right down to it, payment shouldn’t be the standard by which anyone decides who is a writer. That’s a terrible standard! You and I are both writers — simply because we write.

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